Tag Archives: Muther Grumble

The Historian Detective (or unexpected discoveries)

Doing historical research can be a little like solving a crime, I imagine. Having never solved a crime, I cannot be sure. In oral history mode, tracking people down to interview and then speaking to them can be akin to finding witnesses and interviewing them after a crime. And like a police investigation sometimes they give you the suspect, virtually all packed and ready to go; sometimes they cannot offer you much. The same goes for oral history. Interviewing people can be a challenge. But you also learn an incredible amount, not just about the topic you have spoken to them about, but wider issues of history. And not just history; you can learn all about family structures, environments. You might get to see old photos or ephemera you would otherwise not get to see.

For my research, I will conduct interviews with various members of the environmental community who were active in the post-war period. Their experiences and personal histories vary enormously, but you also get a wide range of different voices, which can offer a rich world through which you can select different aspects to put into research. Late last year I discovered the history of a local organisation on Tyneside, from the early 1970s, in an alternative North-East periodical, Muther Grumble which appeared between 1971 and 1973.

One local group, SOC’EM (Save Our City from Environmental Mess) is particularly relevant as although it began in 1972, at the very end of the period I’m looking at, it is an example of the kind of organisation – local, community-led – that I am interested in. I was particularly pleased when I discovered that Tyne and Wear Archives, in Newcastle, have the papers of that organisation. One article in Muther Grumble mentioned another organisation, Commitment, which was London/South-East based. This is harder to trace; typing Commitment into a search engine or electronic archive catalogue, even with words like ‘environment’ with it, come up either with no entries or thousands, none of which, at first glance, seem relevant.

Just when all seems lost, however, through the detective work you’ve done, someone surfaces who has connections to that organisation and you can begin to slowly build up a picture of it.